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Gold Award Girl Scouts: Issues of the world, meet your match.

Gold Award Girl Scouts

Issues of the world, meet your match. 

The Girl Scout Gold Award is the highest award a Girl Scout Senior or Ambassador can earn. Once achieved, it shows colleges, employers, and your community that you’re out there changing the world.

It takes a team, led by a Girl Scout, to complete a Gold Award project and we are here to help!

Check out our 2019 Gold Award Girl Scouts and their world-changing projects!

Gold Award Training

Our online training GSU Gold 101 provides opportunities for Senior and Ambassador Girl Scouts to learn about the Gold Award requirements and brainstorm their project ideas.

During this time Girl Scouts and their caring adults will learn about the Gold Award Process from beginning to end, including:

  • How to find your passion and the Root Cause
  • Building YOUR support team
  • Budgeting
  • Creating your Plan of Work (Timeline)
  • What a measurable impact is
  • How to access the online Go Gold System

PLEASE NOTE: starting August 1st 2019 all girls who would like to earn their Gold Award are required to go through the online Gold Award training. To be granted access to the training please email Programs@gsutah.org 

Gold Award Process

Use the checklist below to help you keep track of your Gold Award Progress! 

  1. You want to earn your Gold Award
  2. Find something you are passionate about. 
    1. Research what needs are out there and who could be your Project Advisor
  3. Email programs@gsutah.org ask for access to take the GSU Gold 101 Training (required)
  4. Submit your proposal to GSU
  5. Receive feedback from the Gold Award Committee
  6. Attend your initial interview
  7. Create an account on My Go Gold
  8. Go through Steps 1-5 on the My Go Gold System
  9. Do your project
  10. Keep track of your work through My Go Gold System
  11. Once complete, submit your Final Report through the My Go Gold System
  12. Receive feedback from the Gold Award Committee
  13. Attend your final interview

Proposal and Final Report: the Gold Award Committee will review both your proposal and final report and provide feedback to be addressed at your Gold Award Interviews.

Interviews: you will need to have both an initial interview (after receiving feedback about your proposal) and a final interview (after receiving feedback about your final report).  You can register for an interview through the GSU Website.  CLICK HERE to find upcoming Gold Award Interview dates, times, and locations.

FAQs About the Gold Award

Who can earn the Girl Scout Gold Award?

Girl Scout Seniors (9th - 10th grade) and Ambassadors (11th - 12th grade) are eligible to earn their Gold Award. A girl can work on her project until the end of the Girl Scout membership year (September 30th) following her Senior year in High School.

What are the prerequisites to beginning a Gold Award project?

  • Be a currently registered member of the Girl Scouts of the USA in grades 9 – 12.
  • Attend a Gold Award Support Meeting prior to submitting your Project Proposal
  • You must complete your Leadership Journeys before beginning your Gold Award.
  • If you have completed your Silver Award, you must do one additional Senior or Ambassador Journey.
  • If you have not completed your Silver Award, you must do two Senior or Ambassador Journeys.

How do I know when a Journey is “completed?”

A Journey is completed when you have earned all of the Journey awards which will include creating and carrying out a Take Action Project. . .Be prepared to discuss your Journey and Take Action project during your Initial Interview.

How long does a typical Gold Award Project take?

A year to a year and a half

NOTE: when a girl earns her Gold Award in Utah, Girl Scouts of Utah will purchase her lifetime membership from GSUSA the Fall after she graduates high school.

For Girls
When do you know if you are ready to. . .

 

Take the GSU101 Training?  When you know you want to earn the Gold Award (or maybe you are curious) and you have something you are passionate about!

Submit your Project Proposal:  

  • You have identified the root cause of the issue you want to work with
  • You have a budget (estimates are great, you need an idea of how much things will cost, even if they will be donated)
  • You have an idea of who your Project Advisor will be
  • When someone has proofread your proposal

All girls who want to earn their Gold Award are required to take the GSU 101 Training

Tips and Tricks

  • Complete the Gold Award Proposal word doc you receive from the council (have someone proofread) then Turn it in, after approval and interview, you can copy and paste your answers into the My Go Gold System.
  • When completing your final report, complete the Gold Award Final Report (word doc, have someone proofread) then, copy and paste your answers into My Go Gold System.
  • During your interview you will be asked about the Journey you completed, be prepared to discuss what you learned and what your Take Action Project was.
  • Keep track of all of the work that you have done, including who you are talking with and the hours you are completing.  Do not commit to anything until you have been approved by the Gold Award Committee.

Frequently Asked Questions

What should I wait for until after my initial interview?

After your initial interview and your project is approved, then tell everyone what you are doing for your Gold Award! Share it on social media, get flyers out, secure space, and get your project going. 

What does sustainability mean?

  • Your Gold Award must be sustained beyond your involvement!
  • Your Gold Award IS a Take Action Project.
  • A Take Action Project:
    • Gives a long-term solution to the root-cause of a need in a community
    • Continues to make an impact (sustainable)
    • Solves a problem
    • Addresses a root cause
    • Measurable impact

NOTE: this VIDEO outlines how to Take Action

What is a root cause?

The root cause is the reason or reasons there is an issue.  Please Note: there is more to a Gold then just addressing the root cause, the examples below are only pertaining to understanding the meaning of Root Cause.

Ex. Why does the shelter not have enough food?  The root cause is not that the shelter needs food, it’s that it doesn’t have a regular donation of food.

  • Addressing the root cause could include kicking off an annual food donation drive then partnering with local organizations who would continue the food donation drives.  

Ex. Why are people homeless? The root cause is not that people are homeless, it’s why are they homeless?  Do they have access to training?  Interview clothing? Personal hygiene resources? Addiction issues? Criminal records?

  • Addressing the root cause could include partnering with a homeless shelter to build a program that brings resources into the shelter weekly to help residents overcome barriers.

Ex. Why does your high school have a low graduation rate? The root cause may not be that people don’t want to graduate, there may be many factors.  After researching and learning more, you find out that literacy rates are low at your school. Why?

  • Addressing the root cause could include setting up a literature club, which meets weekly to discuss and connect with the English curriculum at your school.  The club could also go into elementary schools to help younger students learn to read.

How do I build a budget?

Think of all of the things that you will need:

  • Does your team need snacks?
  • How much will gas cost?
  • Where will you print your flyers?
  • How will you pay for your website domain?
  • Is there a space rental cost?
  • Everything costs money, even if it gets donated.
  • Have a Plan A and Plan B, if you don’t get things donated how will you pay for them?
  • Who should I ask to be my Project Advisor?

Who should I ask to be my project advisor?

A Project Advisor should be an expert in some way with what your project is focused on.

Be clear with your Project Advisor that you will need them to be a resource for you as you work towards your goals.  Someone you can ask questions of, who can connect you with others in the field, or someone who can help direct you when barriers come up (because barriers will come up).

Think outside of your comfort zone, beyond friends and family and Girl Scouts.  Who can you network with?  Who can help you meet new people and learn new things?

Resources
Project Advisors: Subject Matter Experts

Once the Girl Scout has been approved to do her Gold Award, the Gold Award Committee Member assigned to be her mentor will reach out to her Project Advisor to have a short phone call during which the Project Advisor can ask questions and the Gold Award Committee Member can clarify any needed items specific to the Girl Scout’s Project.

Project Advisors must sign and return an Agreement Form to Council.

For Troop Leaders

You are invited and encouraged to attend a Gold Award Support Meeting with your Girl Scout.

You will be included in communications with your Girl Scout.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is my role in the Gold Award?

You are your Girl Scout’s cheerleader, sounding board, proofreader, and advocate.

It is her project, she will build it and she will be responsible for it. All communication will be directed at her and when possible will include her adult support team. 

How much should I be involved?

Just enough to keep your Girl Scout supported and motivated. 

Please understand that sometimes a girl’s plan will get derailed, you can be instrumental in helping her get back on track with patience and understanding.

Who do I contact if I have questions about my girl’s Gold Award?

She will have a whole support team. Please contact her Project Advisor or her Gold Award Mentor first.

Then, contact info@gsutah.org if needed. 

For Parents and Guardians

You are invited and encouraged to Go through the Gold 101 Training with your Girl Scout

You can also request to attend the interviews with her.  Please Note: your attendance at the interviews is to ensure clarity of information shared and agreed upon.  Your Girl Scout will be the one being interviewed, you will not be permitted to add commentary

You will be included in communications with your Girl Scout.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is my role in the Gold Award?

You are your Girl Scout’s cheerleader, sounding board, proofreader, and advocate.

It is her project, she will build it and she will be responsible for it. All communication will be directed at her and when possible will include her adult support team. 

How much should I be involved?

Just enough to keep your Girl Scout supported and motivated. 

Please understand that sometimes a girl’s plan will get derailed, you can be instrumental in helping her get back on track with patience and understanding.

Who do I contact if I have questions about my girl’s Gold Award?

She will have a whole support team.  Please contact her Project Advisor or her Gold Award Mentor first.

Then, contact info@gsutah.org if needed. 

Gold Award Committee

What is the Gold Award Committee?

The Gold Award Committee is lead and filled by amazing volunteers dedicated to helping every girl who wants to earn her Gold Award reach her goal. Many people on the committee have either earned their Gold Award, have raised Girl Scouts who have, and have a passion for helping every girl realize her potential.

They will work with your Girl Scout throughout the process, including leading Gold Award Support Meetings, conducting interviews, and mentoring throughout her project.

If you are interested in being a part of the Committee please contact info@gsutah.org

Community Leadership Teams

Gold Award Committee Members are available to attend your Community Meetings to do 30 minute presentations regarding the Gold Award and process.

All Higher Awards Representatives on the Community Leadership Teams are invited to be a part of the Gold Award Committee, either as an active member or as an observer for input and suggestions.